Councilmember Licata left office on January 1, 2016.
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Posts for 'Seattle Public Utilities'

Urban Politics #130: Paying For Sound Transit’S CDF

April 15th, 2002

On Friday, April 13th, the City Council’s Transportation Committee voted 2 to 1 (McIver & Conlin vs. Licata) to pass Council Bill 114115, giving Sound Transit’s Community Development Fund (CDF) $43 million. Half of the money will come from our public utilities: $17.5 million from City Light and $4 million from the Water Department. The other half will come from our general fund or Community Development Block Grant funds if they are available.

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Urban Politics #111: Getting Public Toilets

July 23rd, 2001

Yesterday the City Council passed a resolution essentially giving the contract for establishing 5 public toilets toa company that did not present the most competitive proposal. I believe the process that led us to this situation was flawed. Consequently in good conscious I could not vote for the legislation despite having been a long time advocate for public toilets.

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Urban Politics #76: 1% For Art On Projects Outside Seattle

November 20th, 1999

Council Member Margaret Pageler is proposing an amendment to stop City Utility Departments from funding arts out of their capital projects located outside the city.

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Urban Politics #70: City Light Rate Increase

September 11th, 1999

Seattle City Light has proposed overall electric rates to increase by an average of 3.1% in each of the next three years. For more than half of Seattle’s residential customers, bills would increase less than a dollar per month in 2000. For 37% of the users it would be twenty-five cents a month and the rate climbs steeply for those who consume the most electricity. Qualified low-income customers would continue to receive low-income rates that are half of the regular residential rates.

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Urban Politics #57: City Council On The Merger Of TCI-AT&T

February 16th, 1999

On Tuesday, 2/16/99, the City Council unanimously passed legislation that adopts as much open access for ISPs (Internet Service Providers) as a city legally can. However, the city can not legally set prices for Internet services, so this is the most we can achieve for now, until federal regulations change. More information on this is included in my position statement below. The amount of open access for ISPs, however, is more than other cities have, so it is an important accomplishment.

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Urban Politics #51: How Much Money Do We Have?

November 18th, 1998

The City Government had a total budget of approx. $1.93 billion in 1998. The new proposed budget for 1999 would be $2.04 billion. But three-quarter of these funds is outside of the general fund. They are flow-through funds from other jurisdictions like the State and the Federal Government or are from our City owned utilities, with revenues that cannot be commingled with our general funds.

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Urban Politics #25: Introducing My Staff

January 25th, 1998

Lisa Herbold and Newell Aldrich are my two full time Legislative Assistants. Lisa was my campaign manager and is a graduate of Syracuse University with a degree in Political Science and Journalism. She has been with the Tenants Union for the last 5 years. Newell is a graduate of the UW with a dual degree in Political Sci. and Spanish. He handled press relations during the campaign. Prior to the campaign he had been Co-Chair of the Ralph Nader Washington State Campaign for Democracy. Frank Video, a former member of the Seattle Arts Commission and an established artist, is coming on as a half-time Legislative Assistant in February. Frank also preceded me as President of the 911 Media Arts Center. He attended the University of Washington and majored in Communications Research.

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